Frequently Asked Questions

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feedback in an exceedingly home study course can mostly be essays. This can encourage you to write down a sensible essay.

Many years ago I browse about Electronics, and took a correspondence course on the subject, and made electronic gadgets for where I worked.

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Now that you have had an opportunity to learn some of the facts regarding the court reporting field, you may have some questions. The following are some of the most frequently asked questions about the field of court and realtime reporting:


Q:

What exactly is court reporting?

A:

Court Reporting is the art and skill of recording in shorthand what is said during a particular proceeding and then transcribing it into written form.


Q:

Is more than writing and transcribing involved in court reporting?

A:

Yes. The court reporter also has certain responsibilities and duties in any given situation. For example, he or she may be responsible for swearing in the witnesses, marking and maintaining the exhibits, making sure that the proper signatures appear on a transcript, and so on.


Q:

How are words written on the steno writer?

A:

Words are basically written by sound, syllable, and spelling. For example, if you were to type the word cat on a typewriter, you would type c, then the a, then the t, a three-step process. On the steno machine, you would key KAT in one stroke.


Q:

How do you write the letters that are not on the keyboard?

A:

Combinations of letters are used to represent letters that are not on the keyboard. The system is called shorthand because various shortcuts are used to write letter or words. For example, you notice that no vowel is present on the keyboard? The combination of E and U together are used for the vowel.


Q:

How do you write numbers?

A:

Numbers are written by striking a certain letter in the upper bank of keys along with the number bar located above the upper bank.


Q:

Is the shorthand system hard to learn?

A:

Yes and no. Learning the system is not difticult in the sense that you have a large amount to learn. It is difficult in the sense that many hours of practice are required. Without a doubt, study of the basic theory takes time, determination, and motivation. However, if you know that court reporting is what you want to do, you will enjoy every minute of it. When you think of the long-term benefits you will derive from all your hard work and diligence, it is well worth it.


Q:

Does a court reporter only work in a courtroom setting?

A:

No. Court and realtime reporters can be divided into three general categories as follows: Official Court Reporters-Reporters who work in a courtroom setting or do reporting for governmental agencies. Freelance Reporters-Reporters who work for a deposition or freelance agency or are self-employed. Their work varies from day to day. One day they may be recording hearings for school boards or zoning commissions; the next day they may be taking depositions for lawyers. Realtime Reporters:-Reporters who are employed to produce an instant record on a video screen. Realtime reporters are used in closed captioning for the hearing impaired. They may be used in classroom settings or board meetings where a visual record is required. These reporters may be referred to as steno interpreters. Both official and freelance reporters may use realtime technology.


Q:

If I do not want to be a court reporter, can I still use my skills?

A:

Definitely. Many new opportunities are opening for people who have the skill of writing words in shorthand and having their notes transcribed instantly by a computer. Rapid text input or rapid data entry is used by medical transcriptionists because this technology is quicker than typing from dictated notes. Any business, educational setting, industry, or service that requires fast input and transcription can use the skills of a real time writer.


Q:

How long does it usually take to become a court reporter?

A:

That depends on many factors. If you attend a school that teaches you how to become a court reporter, you can expect to be in class a minimum of two years, full time. If you attend a private school on a part-time basis, it may be longer. Some people have a natural inclination for writing on a shorthand machine and can learn the theory much more quickly than others.


Q:

What about tape recorders? Are tape recorders going to replace court reporters?

A:

No. Although tape recorders do a fine job of recording music or “canned” speeches, live recording is best done by a live court reporter. The reason is that tape recorders not only pick up the voices, but also any other sounds that may go unnoticed, making the record, in some cases, inaudible and untranscribable. A great many studies have been done; and the ultimate conclusion is that the best technology for the money is the live court reporter coupled with the computer to produce an accurate, reliable, and rapid transcript.


Q:

What about video recorders? Are video/audio tape recorders used to take depositions?

A:

Yes. The video recorder works fine; but the fact is that, along with the video recorder, a written record is being made by a live court reporter. Most court reporting firms will offer video recording as a service. Video recording enhances what is called litigation support-those extra services offered to lawyers by court reporting firms.


Q:

Where can I learn more about becoming a court reporter?

A:

Your best source is a court reporter in your area. Most reporters are very friendly and open to talking to people who are interested in their career. Another source of information is the Michigan Association of Professional Court Reporters (MAPCR) at (734) 493-2627 or visit their website at http://www.mapcr.org to learn about the reporting prospects in your area.

 

Copyright © 2007 TextStream Institute of Court Reporting